Where to visit

Places to go in Newquay

Newquay may be known for our golden beaches, and yes while we thoroughly recommend you spend as much time as possible with the sand between your toes, there’s so much more the town can offer.

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Newquay Zoo

Get closer to over 130 of the world’s rare and exciting creatures at the award-winning Newquay Zoo!
Exciting keeper talks as well as activity trails, animal encounters, face painting and children’s play area offer plenty to keep people of all abilities and ages occupied meaning a perfect day out for the whole family.

Blue Reef Aquarium

Over 40 naturally themed habitats take you on a fantastic journey from Cornish waters to exotic seas. Overlooking the mighty Atlantic Ocean, Blue Reef lets you explore Cornwall’s hidden treasures in a series of naturally themed displays highlighting the incredible variety of creatures including the gigantic ocean display complete with underwater tunnel.

The Gannel

In Newquay, the Gannel Estuary provides a glimpse of the town’s seafaring past - and you can explore on foot, kayak or canoe, bike or horseback! The tidal river connecting Newquay with Crantock beach offers over a mile of golden sands sandwiched between sand dunes, the sea, and the tidal river.

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Fistral Beach

Fistral Beach has long been considered one of the UK and Europe’s best surf locations. The beach caters for families offering; surf hire and schools, restaurants, bars, cafes, shopping and shower facilities. Fistral also boasts a state-of-the-art RNLI Lifeguard station.

Lusty Glaze Beach

After climbing down the 133 steps, visitors can admire the sandy cove whilst getting active on a range of adventure activities, including the Wave Runner Safaris and experience fantastic live music and events throughout the year.

Towan Beach

At the heart of Newquay town centre, Towan Beach is home to the iconic house on the island, pictured on many postcards. Within walking distance of the town, it’s a firm favourite of families as everything is close to hand.

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Tolcarne Beach

Further down the bay, and able to be walked to along the sand when the side is out, the smaller and more peaceful Tolcarne beach has all the facilities and is a favourite spot of the locals. A steep slope or steps will take you back up to the other end of town should the tide cut you off, or have a drink at the bar and enjoy the uninterrupted view.

Porth Beach

Nestled just on the outskirts of Newquay, the beach sits in a natural cove, with headlands on either side. If the sun isn’t out, golf and a walk along Porth Headland will offer views back over the town like no other or check out the natural pole holes in the rocks, sending jets of water into the air with the waves. Great for rock pooling and picking mussels at low tide, plenty to explore at Porth.

Newquay Harbour

Our harbour just oozes history, with the original buildings and entrance to the trams still there. Be sure not to miss one of Newquay’s hidden gems, The Boathouse Restaurant, offering up the freshest of catches of the day, as well as full blown fruits de mer, claw pickers fully included!

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Boating Lake

Newquay boating lake is home to many a duck and a gorgeously kept gardens including a fantastic rose garden, stunning when in bloom. With pedalos and row boats in the summer months, and Lakeside Restaurant and ice cream hut to offer refreshments, it’s well worth a visit on a dry day!

Pentire Headland

Stretch your legs with some of the best views in Cornwall. Whether you want to look over Crantock beach and river, out along a never-ending horizon, or back over the iconic Fistral Beach, Pentire headland is a cliff top with the difference. A piece of common with some of the greatest views imaginable, and plenty of benches to take it all in

Huer's Hut

A piece of local history, the Huer's Hut dates back to the 14th century, and is still one of the best look out points in town. Perched on top of the cliffs just beyond the harbour, it makes for a gorgeous pit stop along the coastal path.